Posts Tagged ‘edinburgh’

Luke Sital-Singh In Session


As part of our Record Store Day special, of which there is plenty more to come, we were fortunate enough to have the opportunity to savour the presence of the phenomenally talented Luke Sital-Singh who was in town for the Edinburgh leg of his headline UK tour to promote his new EP ‘Old Flint’. With Luke’s delicate and beautifully toned voice drawing welcome comparisons to Bon Iver and Damien Rice, this Londoner is performing on another level to his peers around him; having recently secured a support slot on The Rolling Stones’ upcoming concert at Hyde Park.

We chatted with Luke about his preference to work and perform alone, self-reflection, and whether or not one of his (formerly) favourite bands, Slipknot, ever recorded an album in a haunted house.

Luke Sital-Singh’s new EP ‘Old Flint’ is available now on Raygun Music via iTunes.

To keep up to date on all things Luke Sital-Singh:
YouTube Channel:
Twitter: @lukesitalsingh

Full Session (including interview)

In Session – Luke Sital-Singh by Radioblagger on Mixcloud


1. Inaudible Sighs (Live on In Session)

2. Bottled Up Tight (Live on In Session)

3. Fail For You (Live on In Session)

Luke Sital-Singh – Inaudible Sighs (Live on In Session)

Luke Sital-Singh – Bottled Up Tight (Live on In Session)

Luke Sital-Singh – Fail For You (Live on In Session)
In Session broadcasts live on every Saturday from 6-7pm featuring a plethora of the hottest new music from the Scottish scene, a roundup of recent and upcoming gigs, and, of course, a guest performing live in the studio.

Follow In Session on Twitter

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Download our free/charity mixtapes which compile every artist featured on In Session 2011 and 2012 here –

Record Store Days


I bought my first vinyl record online – to some extent, a terribly ironic sign of the times, but also a sign of Shetland’s remoteness. It was Elle Milano’s ‘Swearing’s for Art Students’ EP, angsty teenage indie obscurity on limited edition red vinyl. I got number 455 of 500.

My first experience of buying vinyl in a shop was in OneUp in Aberdeen, which sadly closed at the end of January this year.  I bought a handful of 7” singles, including some Maxïmo Park and ¡Forward, Russia!, each 99p. I felt very, very cool. If I hadn’t been a 14 year old girl, I might have tried to strike up conversation with the shop owner, and if I hadn’t lived a sea away I would have been back a little more often.

Since moving to Edinburgh, I have had some great finds in record shops across the city, from taking a gamble on saxophonist Illinois Jacques at Record Shak to things I immediately knew I would cherish, such as a lovely gatefold edition of ‘Beggars Banquet’ alongside the Grease soundtrack from VoxBox. My local record shop, however, will always be Clive’s.

I never bought vinyl in Clive’s. By the time I came on the scene it was first cassettes, and then CDs – too early for the record resurgence. I remember getting Marvin and Tamara’s Groove Machine on tape, which I still own. What do you mean you don’t remember them? It was the summer of ’99, baby:

I remember my mum and nan discussing in hushed tones whether it was appropriate for me to spend a record token on Wheatus’ debut album because it had a parental advisory sticker. I never did get any more than the radio edit of Teenage Dirtbag. I remember going in with my first proper boyfriend to pick up a copy of Pulp’s ‘Different Class’ so we could discover it together. Cheesy, but so began a love affair that has spanned years (I am of course referring to myself and Jarvis Cocker et al, not the boyfriend). I also remember going in during my heavy Glasgow indie, Domino Records phase and tentatively asking a cheery shop assistant if they had a copy of Sons and Daughters’ ‘Love the Cup’. They did.


Like OneUp, Clive’s also closed, back in 2011, having served Shetland’s population since the 1970s. Of course I played a part in the closure; we all did, and we all continue to do so. The convenience of online shopping and especially of downloading cannot be understated. As well as this, music services such as Spotify – on which I do have a paid account – mean that you can listen to pretty much anything you’ve ever wanted to, and plenty that you didn’t even know you wanted to, at the touch of a button. I use it as background noise when I’m focusing on other tasks. I download songs from the Top 40 that get stuck in my head so that I can play them to death on my walk to university, and then delete them the next time I reorganise my iPod (limited storage you see! It’s not like a physical shelf where you can just perch case upon case, until one day they all fall down and you think ‘maybe I should get a bigger shelf’).

I would hesitate to say that I treat these downloads as disposable. That seems to be unfair to the artists in question, though to some extent that is always how pop music will be consumed. Possibly more appropriate would be to say that I have no connection to the downloading process. I sit on my bed and I click.

I could count the number of music downloads I can vaguely remember carrying out on one hand. Even fewer online CD purchases. There’s no interaction. There’s no story.

People, righteous vinyl junkies, always point out that in a record shop, you can meet like-minded people. You can take risks based on what they recommend to you, and hopefully you can do the same for them. This is absolutely true, especially if you can get over your fear of looking terribly uncool and uneducated – top tip: throwing yourself in at the deep end and buying the most embarrassing thing you can find will blow that right out of the way.

But it’s also a way to bond with people you already know, discovering music together, sharing your tastes and laughing at each other when you almost accidentally purchase some Scandinavian screamo/thrash/metal ‘cause it had a hilarious picture of a cat on the front. Just goes to show you can never judge a record by its sleeve, or something.


Music sharing services online have tried to incorporate this sharing facility, and to some extent they probably are effective. However, realistically, how many times have you seen via Facebook that a friend was listening to something on Spotify, or seen their top 3 artists of the week published on Twitter and thought “hmm, I must tune into some of that”? The experience of heading to a record shop with a friend is a very difficult one to replicate, just as reading in 140 characters that someone you know thinks a film was fairly good is never going to have the same effect as a drawn out discussion with them about it over a couple of pints.

Record Store Day is a fantastic thing to support because record stores are fantastic things – livelihoods – worth supporting. Vinyl is pretty trendy right now: by all means, scrum on down to your nearest emporium today and scramble with the other hipsters for that special edition release. You’ll certainly have a story to tell, and I hope the rush you get will keep you going back. Record shops are worth supporting, but what’s more, they need supporting. Following the demise of Clive’s, Shetland is lacking a dedicated music outlet – and probably always will. On the other hand, Edinburgh’s independent record shop scene appears to be rather densely populated; something for the city to be proud of. If we continue to frequent and nurture these shops, they will continue to give back – and what’s not to like about that?

Interested in exploring Edinburgh’s independent music shop scene? Check out our Nanu Maps: Record Shops to find out more.

Interview: Raconteur Edinburgh


Storytelling nights are all the rage right now, and none is more welcome to the scene then the fantastic Edinburgh endeavour Raconteur. We

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grabbed one of the organizers Satnaam Dusanj for a quick chat ahead of their next event, to find out more about this innovative night. If you fancy the sound of yourself as a bit of a storyteller and reckon you have a story to contribute, all you have to do to get involved, is get in contact with Raconteur on their facebook page or drop them a tweet @RaconteurEd and they will be able to give you all the information you need.

Nanu Streets: Candlemaker Row

Candlemaker Row

Nanu Streets is a brand new feature on, taking a closer look at interesting stretches of Edinburgh that you might have missed. This week we’re featuring the wee stretch of shops on Candlemaker Row, between Greyfriar’s Bobby and Grassmarket. Candlemaker Row is home to a few independent shops perfect for completely unique, slightly unusual purchases.


At the top of the street we find Deadhead Comics. Don’t let the faded yellow paint and dusty windows put you off going in, despite a few of its aesthetic problems is the best comic book shop in Edinburgh for people who actually want to buy comics. Edinburgh’s other comic book retailer has given away huge amounts of floor space to action figures and manga seemingly at the cost of back issues. Deadhead is purely dedicated to comic books and alongside the wide range of current releases and collected editions sits a wide range of back issue comic books. If you are looking to buy books on a regular basis, Deadhead offers a pull list facility so you can guarantee you will never miss an issue. Plus if you miss a book or are looking for a particular graphic novel, it can more often than not be ordered to come in with the next week’s shipment. Opposite Deadhead Comics is another specialist bookshop which could make Candlemaker Row a one stop shop for genre fans. Transreal Fiction dedicates its considerable book shelf space to Science Fiction and Fantasy books alongside some merchandise and cuddly toys; a pleasant addition, if only a fleeting distraction, from the huge numbers of novels on display. Hours could easily be lost for any sci-fi or fantasy fans in this Edinburgh institution. Tucked slightly below ground and further along the street is Analogue Books; a tiny art bookshop crammed with design, art and lifestyle books, magazines and prints. Zines are displayed hanging from the shop’s ceiling and books are laid out in such a way that’s ideal for browsing. You’re guaranteed to find a good handful of interesting reads and not just a forgotten coffee table book. Prints from local artists are available to buy and once in a while a local artist exhibits their work in the shop too. Just next door is the lovely independent boutique Hannah Zakari. The wee shop only opened a couple of years ago, after six years of trading online and specialises in handmade, quirky pieces from independent designers. Delicate, subtle pieces of jewellery are found upon entrance to the boutique, further back a variety of prints and modern illustrations are on display and a Boiler Suited Lego Man necklace is waiting to be picked up by the perfect owner. Ideal for gifts and with a really relaxed

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shopping environment, it’s great to have an Edinburgh branch of Hannah Zakari open for business. Right at the bottom of Candlemaker Row is a very unique shop, a shop that sells dinosaurs. If you reckon owning a Spinosaurus tooth is the coolest thing in the world, and honestly who doesn’t, then Mr Wood’s Fossils is the place for you. Stocking a wide range of fossils, meteorites and minerals Mr Wood’s Fossils offers the chance to own prehistoric relics for surprisingly reasonable prices.   Just beyond Candlemaker Row is Armstrong’s Vintage Emporium. Take a look at our Vintage edition of Nanu:Maps to find out more about Armstrong’s, one of the best loved vintage shops in Edinburgh.

Edinburgh In Apps


A smartphone is no longer simply for the tech-savvy and social network obsessed. An argument in the pub can be settled instantly with Google, there’s no excuse not to reply to your emails and if you’re bored, there’s always another round of Fruit Ninja to play – it’s a surprise when you meet someone who isn’t using one. These Edinburgh-specific smartphone apps make day-to-day life in Scotland’s capital much easier – and what’s more, they’re all free!


Gordon Christie


The classic Edinburgh-based app, Edinbus is a free service which tells you which routes Lothian Buses take, where they stop, and when the next ones are arriving. It also allows you to save stops for quick future reference, and provides information about any disruptions. This is an essential app for any Edinburgh citizen.

City Cabs (Edinburgh) Ltd
Cordic Ltd

City Cabs Edinburgh

For when the buses stop running (or you’re carrying something really heavy!). Choose the date and time, as well as a larger vehicle if necessary, and search for pick-up and drop-off points using GPS. The app also allows you to set up an account which you can use to pay for your taxi rather than having to take a quick stop by a cash machine, adding pennies to the meter. You can then track the taxi as it makes its way to you.

EDI Airport
Edinburgh Airport Ltd

Edi Airport

When you need to escape from the city, this app will be there for you. Allowing you to keep an eye on both arrivals and departures, you can also input your flight number and track its progress. The app gives information about transfers to and from the airport, car parking (including booking), as well as details of the amenities available at the airport – in handy map format.


oMbiel Limited


If you’re a student at the University of Edinburgh, this app will be a great help to you. You can use it to view WebCT, and keep up to date with your courses when you’re out and about. There are campus maps available, useful if you are new to the uni (or have a tutorial somewhere you’ve never heard of). Possibly most importantly, the app links to the library and you can check PC availability as well as viewing your library account information. A good student companion.

Edinburgh Libraries

Edinburgh Libraries

With the Edinburgh Libraries app, you can find the location of your nearest local

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library as well as discover events being held in libraries around the city. A registered library member can log in, check what’s in stock, and renew books associated with their account. There’s even a library based blog to keep up with!


Edinburgh Zoo
Edinburgh Zoo

Edinburgh Zoo

Everyone loves pictures of cute animals, right? This app has got them all, from the aardwolf to the white-faced saki monkey. You can learn about them, and then find out where they’re located in the zoo, ready to scout them out on your next visit. There’s also a visitor guide, the opportunity to support the zoo and a special ‘Panda News’ button. The perfect guide to a fun day out for families and groups of friends alike.

Ian Rankin’s Edinburgh
MMT Digital


There are lots of different tour guide apps available, perfect for a visitor to the city – but for a resident, Ian Rankin’s Edinburgh provides something a little bit different. See the capital through the eyes of Rankin and his famous detective, Rebus. A map highlights the key locations featured in his crime novels, as well as offering tours of the Old Town, Royal Mile, New Town and the Water of Leith. If you feel like doing a little exploring, this is the way to do it.

Edinburgh Festival Fringe
Kotikan Limited

Fringe Festival

A little bit out of date for this year, admittedly, but good to get prepared for next August. This app allows you to plan ahead for your next show – sorted by venue, time or genre – and book tickets on the move. A calendar function keeps track of tickets booked through the app so you’re never in danger of missing a show. Half Price Hut tickets are also available through the app, meaning you don’t have to go all the way to Assembly to get your discounts.

Nanu Maps: Record Shops


Nanu Maps: Record Shops

In this edition of Nanu: Maps, Ellie and Elyse map the best places to pick up a milk crate of vinyl in Edinburgh.

Tune in to Nanu: Live on on Wednesday at 7pm to hear us chat a bit more about our favourite record shops and the vinyl revival.

View Nanu Maps: Record Shops in a larger map

21 St Stephen Street
Wed-Fri: 12.00-17.00, Sat: 10.30-17.00, Sun: 12.00-16.00

VoxBox is a wonderful shop. It looks great, both outside and in: tidy rows of vinyl divided into all sorts of categories (“Bowie/T-Rex/Glam” a favourite). Some of the best records are to be found among the “Just In” selection: there are many reasonably priced classics to be snapped up here before they’ve even been categorised. Delve a little deeper into the back room and flick through a huge assortment of LPs and singles for £1.50 (or seven for £10!). This may, understandably, fill you with dread and expectations of old country B-sides. Thankfully, this is not the case and there are gems to be found in every box. A special mention must be given to VoxBox’s owners, George and Darren (who we interview here). Clearly serious music enthusiasts, both are incredibly helpful and friendly – even approving Ellie’s purchase of “The Best Disco Album in the World”. Now that’s what I call service.

Vinyl Villains
5 Elm Row
Mon-Sat: 10.00- 18.00, Sun: 12.00-16.00

Not too far down Elm Row, Vinyl Villains has an enormous selection of music – particularly CDs, but the vinyl rows are nonetheless tightly packed. This has to be one of the best value record shops in Edinburgh. Although there didn’t seem to be any bulk buy deals, their average record price is far below £10, and often below £5. This is especially relevant here in that Vinyl Villains’ selection of classic records, albums which should be considered essential by any collector, is second to none – and these are often pricey. For new releases, Vinyl Villains probably won’t hit the spot. However, new music enthusiasts need to give themselves a little history lesson now and again, and this shop provides a great resource for that very purpose.

Oxfam Music Shop
64 Raeburn Place
Mon-Wed, Fri-Sat: 10.00- 17.30, Thur: 10.00- 20.00, Sun: 13.00- 17.00

Giving money to charity by buying great music? Everyone’s a winner. Having a branch of Oxfam dedicated solely to music is unusual, and something that Stockbridge should be proud of. It does feel like any other second-hand record shop, with approachable and knowledgeable volunteers staffing its floors. The actual quality of vinyl in here is possibly slightly lower than other shops in the Edinburgh market, but their grading system is sufficient to ensure there are no surprises when you get your purchase home. Cheap and cheerful, the musical selection itself is fairly pop-based, and there will be plenty of things you’ve never heard of (and nor would you want to). However, it’s worth a rake through, all for a good cause, and at prices mainly ranging from £1.99-

£4.99 some of the unfamiliar material could be worth a gamble.

Record Shak
69 Clerk Street
Mon & Thur-Sat: 11.30-18.00, Tues: 14.00-18.00

Record Shak is a great place to go for a browse, with a wide range of music in across many genres. There’s a small selection of CDs available, but it’s the sheer quantity of vinyl that makes Record Shak stand out. Focusing mainly on more specialist material, this isn’t the place to go for new releases or big pop numbers, but it excels in managing to find rarities that the real collectors go for. For this reason, Record Shak’s prices are a little higher than you might find in some of Edinburgh’s other record shops – but once you find that impossible-to-track-down-limited-edition-one-off press, it’s going to be very much worth it.

Elvis Shakespeare
347 Leith Walk
Mon-Sat: 10.00-18.00

It’s all in the name really. Elvis Shakespeare is the place to be if you’re after really great sounds and really great words. Deep drawers line the Leith shop and are chock-a-block full of all kinds of vinyl from punk and indie, to hip hop and dance. It’s a good place to go if you’re looking for inexpensive classics or after something rare and particular. Glance upwards and you’ll find an organised jumble of literature lining the walls. Books mostly range from cheap to very cheap. There’s even a selection of cassettes for the car, comic books, and a box of “reasonably good videos”.

Underground Solu’shn
9 Cockburn Street
Mon-Wed: 10.00-18.00, Thurs: 10.00-19.00, Fri-Sat: 10.00-18.00, Sun: 12.00-18.00

Underground Solu’shn began literally as an underground shop in 1995 and has survived since then as the sole independent record shop in Edinburgh specialising in dance and electronica. As a bit of a serious DJ shop, the predominantly vinyl stock is in top quality condition and a load of top quality stuff to play it on is available in store too. Mixed in with its underground specialities is a healthy collection of disco, classic rock, pop and new indie releases. Prices are top end but perhaps that’s because there isn’t a floppy, scratched vinyl in sight.


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can watch out interview with the store for Record Store Day 2013 over on youtube.


3-15 Rose Street
Mon-Sat: 9.00-21.00, Sun: 11.00-18.00

Owned by HMV, Fopp straddles the gap between high street music retailer and independent music store. Most shop space is taken up by DVDs, CDs and books but there is a steadily increasing vinyl selection upstairs as interest in newly released 180g vinyl grows. Records are shelved rather than boxed with album art on display making a really inviting section to browse in. As well as new releases, re-released classic albums from little known artists The Beatles and The Smiths are available, as are bargain secondhand records for a mere £2.

Avalanche Records
5 Grassmarket
Mon-Sat: 11.00-18.00, Sun: 12.00-18.00

Last week Avalanche Records announced that they will be closing their doors on 6th January next year. In a statement on the website’s blog, the store’s owner explained the reasons behind the closure;

“The biggest loss has been in selling local and Scottish bands. While our reputation has grown, our sales have plummeted.”

Avalanche has been seen as a platform for new Scottish music and unsigned talent but has been the subject of criticism. Perhaps a revised and revitalised shop would work for Avalanche in the future. In the meantime, there are hopes that Avalanche will return as an online presence and keep promoting Scottish talent.

Update: the shop remains open, you can check out an interview we did with store owner Kevin Buckle here.


Nanu Maps: Fish and Chips

Fish and Chips

This week, Ellie and Elyse loosen their belts in preparation for a deep fried edition of Nanu Maps. Wooden forks at the ready, the girls follow their noses around the Capital, sampling the best battered suppers Edinburgh has to offer.

View Nanu Maps: Fish and Chips in a larger map
Newington Fish Bar
23 South Clerk Street
Mon-Fri lunchtime 12:30 – 14:30 ; Sun-Thurs evening 16:30 – 01:00 ; Fri-Sat evening 16:30 – 02:00

Living in Newington guarantees no shortage of chip and kebab shops, but Newington Fish Bar has managed to make itself stand out among the crowd. The quality and quantity of food on offer more than makes up for the high pricing at this establishment. Everything is cooked fresh to order, ensuring nothing dries out or gets soggy while sitting under the heat lamps on the counter. As well as your standard haddock, sausage or pie suppers, Newington Fish Bar offers a number of more unusual fish options – including an ever-changing “fish of the week”. Most importantly, their chips are a lovely mix of fluffy and crunchy, served in what could almost be described as a shoebox. Certainly worth a visit if you fancy splashing out on your takeaway.


54a Clerk Street
Mon-Sat 11:30 – 00:00 ; Sun 16:00 – 00:00

Papponi is a relative newcomer, popping up this summer on Clerk Street. It has already gathered a considerable following thanks to its incredibly cheap prices: for example, a large portion of “proper” chips is only £1.80, virtually unheard of in the Edinburgh market. Thankfully, the low prices do not mean a compromise in terms of taste – their chips are delicious. There is a huge range of food available, from standard sausage and haggis suppers to freshly made pastas and pizzas. Meat-eaters also highly rate their selection of pies, both in terms of value and taste. As an added bonus, if you’re feeling lazy or just live a bit far away, Papponi offer home delivery through JustEat – so there’s no excuse to not give it a go.


Bene’s Fish and Chip Shop
162 Canongate
Open for lunchtime daily, Mon–Thur 16.30-00.00 ; Fri–Sat 16:30 – 02:00 ; Sun 16:30 – 00.00

Bene’s on the Royal Mile is so good, it’s Royal recommended. Framed newspaper clippings on the side of the bar tell the story of when the Palace sent a Royal trustee up the road to Bene’s for a fish supper. Prince Edward was apparently very satisfied. The traditional stuff is done really well, usually cooked while you wait. Pizzas are another speciality of Bene’s, always made to order with added TLC. Prices are moderate given the

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quality of the food and there’s a few really cheap lunchtime options on offer too. With praise as high as it can get, enormous portions and friendly staff it’s definitely worth a trip to enjoy the crowning glory of chip shops in Edinburgh.


148 High Street
Mon-Fri 11.00 – 01.00; Sat 11.00-02.30; Sun 11.00 – 01.00

It says Pizzas and Kebabs on the outside but the classic fish supper is one of the best around. The flaky fish and soft yet crunchy chips are simple and delicious. There’s a few seats outside on the Royal Mile which are fantastic in the summer months for enjoying your freshly cooked supper al fresco. There’s also couple of spaces inside too for when it’s a bit chilly. Open until at least 1am everyday and in centre of the city, it’s ideal for a late night takeaway and also caters for the experimental deep fried market. Onion rings, mars bars and ribs are available in batter, to name but a few.


Nanu Maps: Edinburgh film locations


Ignore the fact that London gets all the premieres, red carpet receptions and star-studded frippery. Disregard Sheffield’s Sean Bean-themed chip shops and rugged sky; snub Derbyshire’s rugged hills (what, like there’s nowhere else to film a Jane Austin adaptation?). The Athens of North has

more than its fair share of movie locations.

One Day

Let’s get the obvious one over with, shall we? One Day has several scenes set in Edinburgh – notably Anne Hathway and Jim Sturgess’ first on-screen kiss – which takes place on Cockburn St in the Old Town.


Princes St features right at the start of the 90’s classic, with Euan McGregor’s Renton and Ewan Bremner’s Spud being chased down the city’s foremost high street. McGregor’s iconic voiceover playing over Lust For Life made this exhilarating opening scene one of the most famous in British cinematic history.

Hallam Foe

A weird, magnetic film, Hallam Foe stars Jamie Bell as an oedipal teenager on the run in Edinburgh. He lives in the clocktower of the Balmoral Hotel and spies into his lover’s apartment on Cockburn Street, and somehow nobody thinks this is strange.

The Illusionist

An enchanting animation from the makers of Belleville Rendesvouz that sees a French magician leave Paris on an impromptu search for work in Edinburgh. Most of the animated scenes of the city are idealised, though Salisbury Crags and the Jenners department store both feature. In one iconic scene, the magician watches a Jacques Tati movie in the main screen of the Cameo cinema on Leven St.

Chariots of Fire

Whilst Salisbury Crags might be an imposing, rugged stage on which to shoot a pivotal scene of your film – the filmmakers got one major thing wrong about this section of the film that sent Hollywood into an Anglophiliac frenzy. Namely, that nobody in their right mind ever goes for a jog in Holyrood Park in the rain. It just doesn’t happen.

Young Adam

Euan McGregor features again in this dark, grimy film about coal miners in the Central Belt. It heavily features the Union Canal (which starts in Edinburgh’s West End and runs all the way to Glasgow), because much of it set on a coal barge.

The Thirty-Nine Steps

The colour remake of Hitchcock’s 1935 adaptation of Buchan’s thriller was mainly shot in a studio, but used footage of the Forth Bridge to recreate Hitchcock’s shots of the bridge for a scene where Richard Hannay climbs out of a train.

Two Weeks In September

You’ve probably never heard of it, but this 1967 film had some profound consequences on the local area; it means that Brigitte Bardot visited Portobello beach. That strip damp of sand just got a lot sexier.